Eastside H20 Rain Wheels

ABOUT POST

The latest version of our rain wheel called the Eastside H20 is still as simple and solid as many we've made over the years. As one of the only production rain wheel on the market, we've been producing them since 2008 to fill the needs of riders skating on wet pavement. They've came in handy to many all over the world in wet climates. They make for a safer ride when going places for those who want more traction when skating around in the rain. Also they've helped many downhill racers make it down the hill without sliding off the road and getting them to the next round of heats. There are some great examples of moments in history from documented races in the photos here. After testing many types, sizes, and widths of wheels with various size cuts in the wheels, we chose the wheel and design that works best overall. 70mm/78a with a 42mm contact patch were the most effective with our size/placement of cuts in the wheels. And they work great giving you a better feel for the road when going fast into wet corners and such. It's not like all of a sudden the road is dry because you have them on. It's really more like you can feel your board sliding with more control and feel your wheels gripping as you slow down. Compared to not having rain wheels where you simply slide way too fast and never feel your wheels grip again. Thus you go off the road and/or crash out most of the time. With a little practice, you can adjust your riding with them and are able to attack downhill runs a lot harder than if you didn't have them. Over a few years of seeing them perform in the races and such, we noticed rain wheels can be tricky to ride when the road is patchy wet or not all wet. The dry sections can be almost too grippy and sometimes throw you off or literally chuck you off your board when sliding. However last year we tested them in stoneground and was pleasantly surprised. They work the same in purely wet conditions providing the same grip as the older non-stoneground version. However when the road is patchy wet with some dry spots, the stoneground has an advantage. When you slide from wet to dry, the stoneground surface slides smoother because its broken in as they say pre-scrubed. The stoneground allows for a smoother slide on the dry pavement and if you slide back into a wet section, the overall slide is more consistent. And a lot less hurky jerky when sliding through patchy sections. The most recent outing I had, along with several others who were prepared to ride in the rain, was the last Maryhill Freeride in late September 2013. She was a blast in the rain with the H20s! As a regular rider I was heelside pre-drifting a lot of the left turns just shedding of enough speed to grip the immediately following right toeside turns. I had some great runs with Patrick Switzer who also attacked the hill in the same manner carrying lots of speed out of the rights. My motto is always take the H20s where ever you go to skate, you never know when its going to rain. And most of the time if you bring 'em you won't need 'em. And if you don't bring 'em then it will rain and you'll need 'em haha. They only take a few runs to understand how they perform and then you're back to blasting the hill even though the weather is crap. Your still having fun and if at a race it can make all the difference in doing well.

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Post Created: October 27, 2013

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Portland Switchbacks

Portland Switchbacks

Eastside riders with the H20 Rain Wheels holding onto the inside of the first turn.


Team rider Eric Hovey

Team rider Eric Hovey

Racing on the H20's at the Whistler Downhill in 2012. Photo by Scott Wipperman.


Alex Tongue on Mary's wet curves.

Alex Tongue on Mary's wet curves.

Racing at the very wet Maryhill Festival of Speed 2009 placing 10th. Photo by Keith Smith.


Casey Morrow winning in Cali.

Casey Morrow winning in Cali.

Winning the race and all his heats at the Cali #5 NorCal Race on May 25th, 2008 hosted by James Kelly.


Predrifting wet lefts at Mary.

Predrifting wet lefts at Mary.

Kicking out the back just enough to shed a lil speed and grip back up before the many following right turns...The Mach 3, Caliber trucks, and H20 wheels was a perfect setup in the rain! Photo by Dawn Moisanen


Grippin' and rippin'!

Grippin' and rippin'!

Taking the rights after the lefts with speed was insanely fun and exciting, just on the edge of traction with the H20s made for some killer pack runs. Photo by Carl Warren.


Following Switzer with the H20s.

Following Switzer with the H20s.

Had some rad runs with Patrick who's got this hill down to a science, even in the rain, no wonder he's won MFOS three times! Photo by Dawn Moisanen


Freshly cut H20s

Freshly cut H20s

In the middle of a cutting session, lots of urethane debris in the shop.


Stoneground close-up

Stoneground close-up


Eastside H20 RainWheels

Testing the Eastside H20 Rain Wheels at the Portland Switchbacks.


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POST BY
Robin McGuirk
Robin McGuirk
Portland, Oregon United States
ABOUT POST

The latest version of our rain wheel called the Eastside H20 is still as simple and solid as many we've made over the years. As one of the only production rain wheel on the market, we've been producing them since 2008 to fill the needs of riders skating on wet pavement. They've came in handy to many all over the world in wet climates. They make for a safer ride when going places for those who want more traction when skating around in the rain. Also they've helped many downhill racers make it down the hill without sliding off the road and getting them to the next round of heats. There are some great examples of moments in history from documented races in the photos here. After testing many types, sizes, and widths of wheels with various size cuts in the wheels, we chose the wheel and design that works best overall. 70mm/78a with a 42mm contact patch were the most effective with our size/placement of cuts in the wheels. And they work great giving you a better feel for the road when going fast into wet corners and such. It's not like all of a sudden the road is dry because you have them on. It's really more like you can feel your board sliding with more control and feel your wheels gripping as you slow down. Compared to not having rain wheels where you simply slide way too fast and never feel your wheels grip again. Thus you go off the road and/or crash out most of the time. With a little practice, you can adjust your riding with them and are able to attack downhill runs a lot harder than if you didn't have them. Over a few years of seeing them perform in the races and such, we noticed rain wheels can be tricky to ride when the road is patchy wet or not all wet. The dry sections can be almost too grippy and sometimes throw you off or literally chuck you off your board when sliding. However last year we tested them in stoneground and was pleasantly surprised. They work the same in purely wet conditions providing the same grip as the older non-stoneground version. However when the road is patchy wet with some dry spots, the stoneground has an advantage. When you slide from wet to dry, the stoneground surface slides smoother because its broken in as they say pre-scrubed. The stoneground allows for a smoother slide on the dry pavement and if you slide back into a wet section, the overall slide is more consistent. And a lot less hurky jerky when sliding through patchy sections. The most recent outing I had, along with several others who were prepared to ride in the rain, was the last Maryhill Freeride in late September 2013. She was a blast in the rain with the H20s! As a regular rider I was heelside pre-drifting a lot of the left turns just shedding of enough speed to grip the immediately following right toeside turns. I had some great runs with Patrick Switzer who also attacked the hill in the same manner carrying lots of speed out of the rights. My motto is always take the H20s where ever you go to skate, you never know when its going to rain. And most of the time if you bring 'em you won't need 'em. And if you don't bring 'em then it will rain and you'll need 'em haha. They only take a few runs to understand how they perform and then you're back to blasting the hill even though the weather is crap. Your still having fun and if at a race it can make all the difference in doing well.

Post Created: October 27, 2013

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Portland, Oregon, United States

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